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Tag: Connectivity

Global brain dynamics during social exclusion predict subsequent behavioral conformity

Published in: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Volume 13, Issue 2, 182-191 Abstract “Individuals react differently to social experiences; for example, people who are more sensitive to negative social experiences, such as being excluded, may be more likely to adapt their behavior to fit in with others. We examined whether functional brain connectivity during social exclusion in the fMRI scanner can be used to predict subsequent conformity to peer norms. Adolescent males (n = 57) completed a two-part study on teen driving risk: a social exclusion task (Cyberball) during an fMRI session and a subsequent driving simulator session in which they drove alone… Read More

Task-residual functional connectivity of language and attention networks

Published in: Brain and Cognition, Volume 122, April 2018, 52-58 Abstract “Functional connectivity using task-residual data capitalizes on remaining variance after mean task-related signal is removed from a time series. The degree of network specificity in language and attention domains featured by task-residual and resting-state data types were compared. Functional connectivity based on task-residual data evidenced stronger laterality of the language and attention connections and thus greater network specificity compared to resting-state functional connectivity of the same connections. Covariance between network nodes of task-residuals may thus reflect the degree to which two regions are coordinated in their specific activity, rather than… Read More

Resting-state functional connectivity predicts neuroticism and extraversion in novel individuals

Published in: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Volume 13, Issue 2, 224-232 Abstract “The personality dimensions of neuroticism and extraversion are strongly associated with emotional experience and affective disorders. Previous studies reported functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity correlates of these traits, but no study has used brain-based measures to predict them. Here, using a fully cross-validated approach, we predict novel individuals’ neuroticism and extraversion from functional connectivity (FC) data observed as they simply rested during fMRI scanning. We applied a data-driven technique, connectome-based predictive modeling (CPM), to resting-state FC data and neuroticism and extraversion scores (self-reported NEO Five Factor Inventory)… Read More

Beyond Functional Connectivity: Investigating Networks of Multivariate Representations

Published in: Trends in Cognitive Sciences, Volume 22, Issue 3, 258 – 269 Abstract “A family of novel methods study the interactions between brain regions taking advantage of the information encoded in multivariate patterns of responses. Some of these methods additionally capture nonlinear interactions, offering insights into how representations are transformed from brain region to brain region. These advances enable researchers to ask questions not only about whether, but also about how multiple brain regions interact.

Dynamic changes in large-scale functional network organization during autobiographical memory retrieval

Published in: Neuropsychologia, Volume 110, February 2018, 208-224 Abstract “Autobiographical memory (AM), episodic memory for life events, involves the orchestration of multiple dynamic cognitive processes, including memory access and subsequent elaboration. Previous neuroimaging studies have contrasted memory access and elaboration processes in terms of regional brain activation and connectivity within large, multi-region networks. Although interactions between key memory-related regions such as the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC) have been shown to play an important role in AM retrieval, it remains unclear how such connectivity between specific, individual regions involved in AM retrieval changes dynamically across the retrieval process and how these changes relate to broader memory networks throughout… Read More

Different neural routes to autobiographical memory recall in healthy people and individuals with left medial temporal lobe epilepsy

Published in: Neuropsychologia, Volume 110, February 2018, 26-36 Abstract “Individuals with medial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) are poor at recalling vivid details from autobiographical memories (AM), instead retrieving gist-like schematic memories. Recent research has suggested that this impoverished recall in comparison to controls may reflect (1) differential engagement of anterior vs posterior regions of the hippocampus (HC) and/or (2) differences between the engagement of the HC vs the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Here we examined these hypotheses by comparing connectivity amongst hippocampal regions and between vmPFC and other brain regions during construction (retrieval of a particular event) vs elaboration (retrieval of perceptual detail) phases of AM recall in 12… Read More

Search and recovery of autobiographical and laboratory memories: Shared and distinct neural components

Published in: Neuropsychologia, Volume 110, February 2018, 44-54 Abstract “Functional neuroimaging evidence suggests that there are differences in the neural correlates of episodic memory for laboratory stimuli (laboratory memory) and for events from one’s own life (autobiographical memory). However, this evidence is scarce and often confounded with differences in memory testing procedures. Here, we directly compared the neural mechanisms underlying the search and recovery of autobiographical and laboratory memories while minimizing testing differences. Before scanning, participants completed a laboratory memory encoding task in which they studied four-word “chains” spread across three word pairs. During scanning, participants completed a laboratory memory retrieval task, in which they… Read More

Task-related and resting-state fMRI identify distinct networks that preferentially support remembering the past and imagining the future

Published in: Neuropsychologia, Volume 110, February 2018, 180-189 Abstract “The relation between episodic memory and episodic future thought (EFT) remains an active target of research. A growing literature suggests that similar cognitive processes and neural substrates tend to support these acts. However, direct comparisons of whole-brain activity reveal clear differences, with numerous regions more active when engaging in EFT than when remembering, and a smaller collection of regions displaying the opposite pattern of activity. Although various network labels have been applied to prior neuroimaging results, to date no formal resting-state functional connectivity analysis has been conducted. In the current experiment, 48 subjects remembered… Read More