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Tag: Default Mode Network

Spectral Diversity in Default Mode Network Connectivity Reflects Behavioral State

Published in: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Volume 30, Issue 4, April 2018, 526-539 Abstract “Default mode network (DMN) functional connectivity is thought to occur primarily in low frequencies (<0.1 Hz), resulting in most studies removing high frequencies during data preprocessing. In contrast, subtractive task analyses include high frequencies, as these are thought to be task relevant. An emerging line of research explores resting fMRI data at higher-frequency bands, examining the possibility that functional connectivity is a multiband phenomenon. Furthermore, recent studies suggest DMN involvement in cognitive processing; however, without a systematic investigation of DMN connectivity during tasks, its functional contribution to… Read More

Search and recovery of autobiographical and laboratory memories: Shared and distinct neural components

Published in: Neuropsychologia, Volume 110, February 2018, 44-54 Abstract “Functional neuroimaging evidence suggests that there are differences in the neural correlates of episodic memory for laboratory stimuli (laboratory memory) and for events from one’s own life (autobiographical memory). However, this evidence is scarce and often confounded with differences in memory testing procedures. Here, we directly compared the neural mechanisms underlying the search and recovery of autobiographical and laboratory memories while minimizing testing differences. Before scanning, participants completed a laboratory memory encoding task in which they studied four-word “chains” spread across three word pairs. During scanning, participants completed a laboratory memory retrieval task, in which they… Read More

Task-related and resting-state fMRI identify distinct networks that preferentially support remembering the past and imagining the future

Published in: Neuropsychologia, Volume 110, February 2018, 180-189 Abstract “The relation between episodic memory and episodic future thought (EFT) remains an active target of research. A growing literature suggests that similar cognitive processes and neural substrates tend to support these acts. However, direct comparisons of whole-brain activity reveal clear differences, with numerous regions more active when engaging in EFT than when remembering, and a smaller collection of regions displaying the opposite pattern of activity. Although various network labels have been applied to prior neuroimaging results, to date no formal resting-state functional connectivity analysis has been conducted. In the current experiment, 48 subjects remembered… Read More