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Tag: Eye Gaze

Perceptual But Not Complex Moral Judgments Can Be Biased by Exploiting the Dynamics of Eye-Gaze

Published in: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Volume 147, Issue 3, 409-417 Abstract “Can judgments be biased via passive monitoring of eye-gaze? We examined this question using a perceptual discrimination task (Experiment 1) and a complex moral judgment task (Experiment 2). Information about the location of participants’ gaze at particular time-points in a trial was used to prompt responses. When there was no objective perceptual information available to decision-makers, the timing of the prompt had a small, but detectable effect on judgments (Experiment 1). However, this small effect did not scale up to more complex judgments about moral issues (Experiment 2).… Read More

Building an ACT‐R Reader for Eye‐Tracking Corpus Data

Published in: Topics in Cognitive Science, Volume 10, Issue 1, 144-160 Abstract “Cognitive architectures have often been applied to data from individual experiments. In this paper, I develop an ACT‐R reader that can model a much larger set of data, eye‐tracking corpus data. It is shown that the resulting model has a good fit to the data for the considered low‐level processes. Unlike previous related works (most prominently, Engelmann, Vasishth, Engbert & Kliegl, 2013 ), the model achieves the fit by estimating free parameters of ACT‐R using Bayesian estimation and Markov‐Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques, rather than by relying on the mix of… Read More

Theta resting EEG in TPJ/pSTS is associated with individual differences in the feeling of being looked at

Published in: Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Volume 13, Issue 2, 216-223 Abstract “Direct eye gaze is a powerful stimulus in social interactions, yet people vary considerably in the range of gaze lines that they accept as being direct (cone of direct gaze, CoDG). Here, we searched for a possible neural trait marker of these individual differences. We measured the width of the CoDG in 137 healthy participants and related their individual CoDG to their neural baseline activation as measured with resting electroencephalogram. Using a source-localization technique, we found that resting theta current density in the left temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and… Read More

Performance in a Collaborative Search Task: The Role of Feedback and Alignment

Published in: Topics in Cognitive Science, Volume 10, Issue 1, 55-79 Abstract “When people communicate, they coordinate a wide range of linguistic and non‐linguistic behaviors. This process of coordination is called alignment, and it is assumed to be fundamental to successful communication. In this paper, we question this assumption and investigate whether disalignment is a more successful strategy in some cases. More specifically, we hypothesize that alignment correlates with task success only when communication is interactive. We present results from a spot‐the‐difference task in which dyads of interlocutors have to decide whether they are viewing the same scene or not. Interactivity… Read More

Seeing the conflict: an attentional account of reasoning errors

Published in: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Volume 24, Issue 6, December 2017, 1980-1986 Abstract “In judgment and reasoning, intuition and deliberation can agree on the same responses, or they can be in conflict and suggest different responses. Incorrect responses to conflict problems have traditionally been interpreted as a sign of faulty problem-solving—an inability to solve the conflict. However, such errors might emerge earlier, from insufficient attention to the conflict. To test this attentional hypothesis, we manipulated the conflict in reasoning problems and used eye-tracking to measure attention. Across several measures, correct responders paid more attention than incorrect responders to conflict problems,… Read More

An eye movement corpus study of the age-of-acquisition effect

Published in: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Volume 24, Issue 6, December 2017, 1915-1921 Abstract “In the present study, we investigated the effects of word-level age of acquisition (AoA) on natural reading. Previous studies, using multiple language modalities, showed that earlier-learned words are recognized, read, spoken, and responded to faster than words learned later in life. Until now, in visual word recognition the experimental materials were limited to single-word or sentence studies. We analyzed the data of the Ghent Eye-tracking Corpus (GECO; Cop, Dirix, Drieghe, & Duyck, in press), an eyetracking corpus of participants reading an entire novel, resulting in the first eye… Read More